Posts Tagged ‘Barbados’

More scenes from Queen’s Park

December 30, 2008

You asked and we are pleased to deliver even more scenes from that quintessential Barbadian Christmas tradition – the annual promenade in Queen’s Park.

Undeterred by the early morning showers, hundreds of Barbadians turned out in Queen’s Park on Christmas morning to see and be seen in their Christmas best!

 

Picture by Amanda Lynch-Foster

Pictures by Amanda Lynch-Foster

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Scenes from Queen’s Park on Christmas Morning

December 26, 2008

Christmas in Queen’s Park. It is as Bajan a Christmas tradition as black cake, jug-jug or sorrel.

This trio of young gentlemen confided that it took a year to plan and coordinate their elaborate outfits.

This trio of young gentlemen confided that it took a year to plan and coordinate their elaborate outfits.

Every year, hundreds of Barbadians flock to the park in Bridgetown, decked out in the sort of sartorial splendour not even seen at weddings or balls. Against a backdrop of Christmas tunes compliments the Royal Barbados Police Force Band, Promise and other performers, Barbadians stroll through the park, greeting friends they may not have seen in some time and stopping willingly to pose for anyone who asks. Our photographers were in the park yesterday and captured some of the scenes.

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Barbados gets all lit up

December 26, 2008

 

bcb-lightshusbands

This house at Clerview, St. James has been an eye-catching spectacle.

 

IT IS THAT time of year when Barbadians break out the lights and decorations and brighten the night with colour.

Some of the designs are so intricate and well organised that you cannot help but stop and admire them.

Here are a few of the houses which caught the attention of NATION photographers Charles Grant, Rawle Culbard and Basil Griffith. Read the rest of this entry »

What is Christmas without cake?

December 23, 2008

You asked for a good old Bajan pudding recipe and we have heard your call! Just in time for the traditional Christmas Eve baking spree, here is a pudding recipe from chef Michelle Maloney, executive chef at Bagatelle Great House in St Thomas and this year’s winner of The Governor-General’s Award Of Excellence at the National Independence Festival of Creative Arts (NIFCA).

Since we’re on the topic of cake and what with it being the season of giving, we have also decided to throw in a great cake recipe as well. It may be a bit late to get it done in time for Christmas but don’t let that stop you!

Traditional Barbadian pudding

Ingredients

1 lb Glow Spread

14 ozs granulated sugar

2 tbsp baking powder

1 lb flour

3 tsps vanilla essence

10 eggs

25 ml milk

Read the rest of this entry »

Independence Square becomes Enchanted Forest

December 22, 2008

 

 

Photo by Marcille Haynes

Photo by Marcille Haynes

Under the gaze of Errol Walton Barrow’s Statue, the Father of Independence, the square, so named, was transformed into a spectacular Christmas Enchanted Forest.

It was the scene of the Independence Square tree-lighting ceremony, hosted by Coca-Cola, a subsidiary of Banks Holdings Ltd (BHL), where at the flick  of a switch, massive Christmas trees strung with garlands upon garlands of red and white lights, the official Coca-Cola colours, transformed Independence Square into a fantasy world from the northern world of Disney complete with lighted reindeer.

Decorated with images of polar bears and Coca-Cola bottles, with marl set around the base to resemble freshly fallen snow, and compost to resemble the forest bed, the trees were a big attraction for children and adults who came out to enjoy the ambience of an American Christmas scene of carolling in Bridgetown. Read the rest of this entry »

Oh for a Bajan sweet bread…

December 22, 2008

Many of you have been reminiscing about enjoying special Bajan delicacies such as great cake and sweet bread at Christmas. One reader mentioned that now that she is spending her Christmas in a colder clime, she has been sweet bread-less as she did not know the recipe.

Another one of our readers, J noticed that and figured that no Bajan should have to be without sweet bread at Christmas or any time of the year for that matter and so kindly volunteered a recipe.

Enjoy!

——

Dear Digital Editor,

I was enjoying your Christmas blog and I noticed that some people don’t know how to bake sweet bread.  Since it isn’t hard I am sending you this recipe for putting on the Christmas blog so that Bajans near and far can have a happy sweet bread Christmas.
 
N.B. – This is a mixed coconut bread.  No kneading required.
 

Light the oven and turn to 350 degrees Farenheit.

 Wash and dry your containers, hands and counter.

Ingredients 

4 cups flour
4 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 tsp mixed spice
1/4 grated nutmeg
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup shortening
1 1/2 cups sugar
4 eggs
2 cups milk or water
1 tsp almond essence
1 tsp vanilla essence
2 cups grated coconut
1 cup raisins
1/2 cup baking cherries, washed, dried and cut up Read the rest of this entry »

Memories of a Bajan Christmas – a tale of pigs and razors

December 20, 2008

Whatever happened to engaging the pig for Christmas?

In the countryside of old time Barbados, many families kept pigs which were slaughtered to feed the family. Some was also sold to friends, neighbours and co-workers. But before the pig was slaughtered it had to be engaged. Since most families had no electricity nor refrigeration it was important that the whole pig was engaged (people had committed to buying the pork) before the slaughtering took place. The parents or an older child would go from house to house with a black lead (pencil) and an exercise book with which they would write down the orders – two pounds here, three pounds there, maybe a whole shoulder or leg for a better off family.

Foreday morning on the day before Christmas Eve, the butcher would show up at the house with his tools a ‘sticking-iron;, a large very sharp butcher’s knife and a razor with which to shave the hair off the pig.

Except on this morning, the butcher, who liked his drinks and who was the housewife’s brother turned up without a razor. On this occasion the husband of the house had decided to sleep through the excitement. After all his wife, her brother the butcher, and the family’s older children had things in control right? Read the rest of this entry »

Ignatius Byer, St. Leonard’s sing their hearts out

December 20, 2008

IT WAS CELEBRATION TIME at Mall Internationale on Wednesday as St Leonard’s Boys’ Secondary School and Ignatius Byer Primary copped the top prizes in the fifth Sing Your Heart Out competition.

the students of Ignatius Byer were adjudged the Best Primary School voices in the competition, and they certainly made those voices heard. Music and arts teacher Hugh Griffith (left) looks just as thrilled. (Picture by Gregory Waldron.)

JUBILATION: the students of Ignatius Byer were adjudged the Best Primary School voices in the competition, and they certainly made those voices heard. Music and arts teacher Hugh Griffith (left) looks just as thrilled. (Picture by Gregory Waldron.)

 The annual Christmas choir competition was keenly contested despite suffering from lower participation than in the past.

Events co-ordinator Kay Thomas said ten primary schools and three secondary schools participated and they now had to return to the drawing board to look at ways to make the competition better.

“The competition is set up to help encourage the children and develop their self-esteem. We will be going back to the drawing board to see which areas we can improve on, and, next year, Springer Memorial will be coming,” she said. Read the rest of this entry »

More Christmas political partying

December 19, 2008

Politicians have been exchanging their political hats for Santa hats during December as they treat constituents to Christmas treats and Christmas cheer.

St Michael North MP Ronald Toppin held his biggest-ever Christmas party for constituents at the Soroptimists Senior Citizens Village in Eden Lodge on Sunday.

“We have 500 people here. It’s the biggest ever. At one stage we ran out of chairs,” said a jolly Toppin as he served up traditional Bajan Christmas fare.

St. Michael North MP Ronald Toppin (in Santa hat) served up Christmas delights for his constituents.

St. Michael North MP Ronald Toppin (in Santa hat) served up Christmas delights for his constituents.

 

St James Central MP and Minister of  International Transport, George Hutson, also sported a Santa hat for his constituency Christmas party at a private residence on the West Coast. In fact, Hutson went all out and donned a full Santa suit as he presented gifts to nearly 400 children from his constituency last Saturday. The only thing that was missing were the reindeer and sleigh as he doled out gifts from his sack.

Is it Santa? No, but close enough - it is St. James Central MP George Hutson playing the role quite well at his annual constituency Christmas party.

Is it Santa? No, but close enough - it is St. James Central MP George Hutson playing the role quite well at his annual constituency Christmas party.

“I have been hosting this party and playing Santa  Claus for a number of years and the kids look forward to our party. We do it for the children and keep them happy,” he said.

Whatever Happened To…Christmas scrubbers?

December 19, 2008

Nation reader and letter writer Luther G. Francis asked the question obliquely a few days ago – whatever happened to the Christmas time scrubbers?

Even the term may seem alien to a younger generation but in the Barbados of old, scrubbers were in every country district. And no… they did not actually scrub – they sang. Read his yuletide reminisce below.

Celebrations started in earnest in the dark of Christmas Eve in times when country districts were yet without street lights.

Scrubbers would commence their itinerary and could be heard singing somewhere in the deep.

Children waited with just as much zeal and anxiety as those anticipating Santa Claus to come down the chimney, but the scrubbers always seemed to take too long to reach their house, so many of them were overcome by sleep.

Eventually they arrived and the household was awakened by them turning up right under the window. Sometimes they were not even known; their identities were shielded by the darkness. Read the rest of this entry »

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